Esports, Drone Racing May Go Official at Texas Schools. Picture: Esports

Esports, Drone Racing May Go Official at Texas Schools

Newsroom Oct 21, 2022

Esports and drone racing proponents have formally asked the University Interscholastic League to recognize these activities in Texas high schools.

Overview:

  • A proposal for authorized exports was initially discussed by UIL in 2019, then revisited in 2021.
  • The Texas Scholastic Esports Foundation currently runs non-profit events, but additional high school Esports contests and tournaments are often organized and run by other organizations.

At the association's Legislative Council meeting on Sunday, the proponents of Esports and drone competitions, two rising sports in Texas, made their case for UIL-sanctioned events. According to Danielle Johnson, executive director of the Texas Scholastic Esports Foundation in Georgetown, as a community of educators, they feel that Esports can be an accessible, inclusive, and equitable path for Texas kids to prepare for college and careers. In Austin, Sheraton said during the meeting's public hearing session.

According to PlayVS, a high school Esports group with NFHS support, Esports is recognized by 16 state athletic organizations globally, including TAPPS in Texas. Additionally, Johnson said 40 colleges and institutions in the state and more than 700 public high schools in Texas offer Esports programs. OpTic Gaming, one of the most well-known professional Call of Duty teams worldwide, is based in North Texas.

You can also download the Tournafest app from Google Play or App Store to play Esports Tournaments & Scrims games like BGMI, Free Fire MAX, Call of Duty, CS: GO, Valorant, Pokemon Unite & win exciting rewards! You may also organize Tournaments & fetch unmatched perks.

A proposal for authorized exports was initially discussed by UIL in 2019, then revisited in 2021. UIL deputy director Jamie Harrison said Esports being accepted as games was a point, rather than an if, in 2019. According to a February article in The Dallas Morning News on the expansion of Esports in high schools, there were 250 kids interested in playing Esports in Burleson ISD, while 661 students participated in an Esports event in Dallas ISD in January. 97 percent of adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 play video games, according to a Pew Research Center report cited by Michaela Frank, an Esports instructor and coach at Frisco Panther Creek.

According to Frank, when children have more space, they like school more, participate and do better academically. They observe it in my pupils. Esports is expanding yearly, and they will fall behind if they don't participate. On Sunday, Johnson suggested that UIL's endorsement may help the game reach new heights. According to Johnson, many school administrators and parents do not see Esports or competitive video games as a viable extracurricular activity. Also left behind are the pupils. For those administrators and parents, legitimacy can only be established by a UIL recognition.

Johnson suggested an Esports state tournament in the spring by UIL and a trial program for the 2023–24 academic year. According to Johnson, the Texas Scholastic Esports Foundation currently runs non-profit events, but additional high school Esports contests and tournaments are often organized and run by other organizations. It is done to make money. She is concerned that the format now can lead to inequity and expose pupils to exploitation by particular interest organizations. Johnson stated that, like UIL, they think that the schools set the regulations. They won't have that choice if they further postpone this trial program. The Policy Standing Committee convened on Sunday and was given Johnson's suggestion.

Approved Drone Racing Proposal Proposed

Approved Drone Racing Proposal Proposed. Picture: Esports
Approved Drone Racing Proposal Proposed. Picture: Esports

The UIL should allow drone racing as a legitimate sport, according to a suggestion made on Sunday by Somerset High STEM facilitator Jessica Dunnegan. Dunnegan also said that drone racing would provide students who would not normally engage in athletics the chance to participate in a competitive sport, much as those who supported Esports. About 150 institutions have shown interest in Dunegan, according to a September interview with The Houston Chronicle. The activity will appeal to kids interested in photography, the military, agriculture, physics, robotics, and STEM, Dunnegan said on Sunday, adding that promoting the growth of drone collaborations statewide would offer possibilities for schools of all types. Most people haven't thought about the enormous possibility that drones provide.

Watch our latest Youtube video.

Drone racing would be more affordable to establish than previous robotics events, according to Dunnegan, who also suggested providing support for needy schools. Students may buy an open-source drone for $225, according to Dan Mantz, CEO of the Robotics Education and Competition Foundation, which sponsors two different high school drone contests. According to Muntz, REC started its drone program in 2019 and now has 500 linked schools around the country. Last May, REC held its first global championships in Dallas, and according to Muntz, among the federal organizations supporting the STEM Council program are NASA and the Department of Defense.

A professional organization for the activity, the Drone Racing League, was established in 2015. Drone operators fly across three-dimensional terrain at up to 90 mph using a first-person perspective. 28 colleges and institutions, including UTSA and UT-Dallas, engage in club-level drone racing competitions under the College Drone Racing Association. In Texas, drones are a component of the environment, according to Muntz. They examine everything, including agricultural practices and smokestacks. Drones provide UIL with a cost-effective way to implement another STEM and workforce program. Dunnegan thinks a state-wide drone program could be set up as soon as next year. In addition to a textbook and standards, Dunnegan stated it would provide instructors a practical purpose to practice the abilities taught in a competitive context.

Powr Esports wins PMPL MEA Championship 2022
POWR Esports wins champions of the PUBG Mobile Pro League (PMPL MEA) Championship Fall 2022 after a strong performance. Overview: * POWR Esports wins champions of the PUBG Mobile Pro League. * Iraqi team Geekay Sports earned third place in the championship. * The squad displayed their prowess a…

You can also download the Tournafest app from Google Play or App Store to play Esports Tournaments & Scrims games like BGMI, Free Fire MAX, Call of Duty, CS: GO, Valorant, Pokemon Unite & win exciting rewards! You may also organize Tournaments & fetch unmatched perks.

Until next time,

#liveitforgaming

Tags

Manish Gupta

I’m a creative thinker. I think it’s important to approach tasks and issues from different angles, rather than doing what has always been done. By having an open mind and taking a different approach.